Inland Oceans... Infinite possibilities...

Join Our Newsletter

A walk down Christmas lane in Selkirk

Volunteers band together for inaugural Holiday Alley

By: Aaron Epp/ Winnipeg Free Press 
Posted: 
11/27/2017 3:00 AM | Last Modified: 11/27/2017 7:55 AM | Updates | Comments: 0

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas in Selkirk.

The city will host Holiday Alley this weekend. The two-day street festival, which celebrates art, sound, light and creativity, will take over a block of old downtown Selkirk on Manitoba Avenue East.

https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/NEP3375087.jpg

Holiday Alley volunteers Maria Freeman (left) and Marlena Muir go over plans at the Riverside Grill for the upcoming festival that will take place in old downtown Selkirk this weekend.

More than 100 volunteers have worked to make the inaugural festival a reality.

"I’m really excited because I love my community, and I think it’s a great place," said Marlena Muir, who is volunteering her time at the festival by organizing a holiday market that will feature 100 crafters and artists.

"Even though it’s a city, it’s very much still small-town oriented."

The festival is an offshoot of Homes for the Holidays, now in its third year, which invites people to tour unique homes and heritage sites in and around Selkirk that are decorated for Christmas.

Holiday Alley will begin at 7:30 p.m. Friday with the illumination of 72,000 newly installed LED lights on 24 buildings on the one-block stretch of Manitoba Avenue East, and continue until Saturday night.

The festival includes a chili cook-off featuring 12 local chefs, as well as a public art display featuring six ice-fishing shacks that are whimsically decorated.

There will be beer and scotch tastings, storytelling by an Indigenous elder and performances by a traditional hand drum group.

Attendees will be able to walk down five back lanes along the festival block that are being turned into galleries and interactive displays, each with their own holiday theme.

Darlene Coughlin, one of the volunteers, says the friendships she’s made have been the best part of volunteering with Holiday Alley.

"Working with a group of ladies, just chatting and visiting — it’s fun," Coughlin says.

She got involved with Holiday Alley after volunteering the last two years with Homes for the Holidays.

Last year, Coughlin and her close friend of more than 10 years, Debby Kaniuga-Benstead, decorated a Selkirk bed-and-breakfast.

Kaniuga-Benstead died in September, making volunteering with Holiday Alley especially poignant for Coughlin.

"This is really hard to do this year because she’s not with me," Coughlin says. "We’re doing this alley, and it’s sort of in remembrance of her. She would have been right in there, partaking with us."

If it weren’t for volunteers, Holiday Alley couldn’t happen, says Joy Balmana, the festival’s logistics and communications co-ordinator.

"Holiday Alley… was developed, it was organized, and it’s run by volunteers," she says.

For Muir, seeing the community come together to put on the festival has been a joy.

"What I’m enjoying the most is just really seeing the teamwork and the connections," Muir says. "I am enjoying my time, and it is a challenge, but I like a challenge. I’ve really been looking forward to it."

The festival is still looking for volunteers. Anyone interested can visit holidayalley.ca/get-involved to apply.

If you know a special volunteer, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

 

A walk down Christmas lane in Selkirk

Volunteers band together for inaugural Holiday Alley

By: Aaron Epp/ Winnipeg Free Press 
Posted: 
11/27/2017 3:00 AM | Last Modified: 11/27/2017 7:55 AM | Updates | Comments: 0

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas in Selkirk.

The city will host Holiday Alley this weekend. The two-day street festival, which celebrates art, sound, light and creativity, will take over a block of old downtown Selkirk on Manitoba Avenue East.

https://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/NEP3375087.jpg

Holiday Alley volunteers Maria Freeman (left) and Marlena Muir go over plans at the Riverside Grill for the upcoming festival that will take place in old downtown Selkirk this weekend.

More than 100 volunteers have worked to make the inaugural festival a reality.

"I’m really excited because I love my community, and I think it’s a great place," said Marlena Muir, who is volunteering her time at the festival by organizing a holiday market that will feature 100 crafters and artists.

"Even though it’s a city, it’s very much still small-town oriented."

The festival is an offshoot of Homes for the Holidays, now in its third year, which invites people to tour unique homes and heritage sites in and around Selkirk that are decorated for Christmas.

Holiday Alley will begin at 7:30 p.m. Friday with the illumination of 72,000 newly installed LED lights on 24 buildings on the one-block stretch of Manitoba Avenue East, and continue until Saturday night.

The festival includes a chili cook-off featuring 12 local chefs, as well as a public art display featuring six ice-fishing shacks that are whimsically decorated.

There will be beer and scotch tastings, storytelling by an Indigenous elder and performances by a traditional hand drum group.

Attendees will be able to walk down five back lanes along the festival block that are being turned into galleries and interactive displays, each with their own holiday theme.

Darlene Coughlin, one of the volunteers, says the friendships she’s made have been the best part of volunteering with Holiday Alley.

"Working with a group of ladies, just chatting and visiting — it’s fun," Coughlin says.

She got involved with Holiday Alley after volunteering the last two years with Homes for the Holidays.

Last year, Coughlin and her close friend of more than 10 years, Debby Kaniuga-Benstead, decorated a Selkirk bed-and-breakfast.

Kaniuga-Benstead died in September, making volunteering with Holiday Alley especially poignant for Coughlin.

"This is really hard to do this year because she’s not with me," Coughlin says. "We’re doing this alley, and it’s sort of in remembrance of her. She would have been right in there, partaking with us."

If it weren’t for volunteers, Holiday Alley couldn’t happen, says Joy Balmana, the festival’s logistics and communications co-ordinator.

"Holiday Alley… was developed, it was organized, and it’s run by volunteers," she says.

For Muir, seeing the community come together to put on the festival has been a joy.

"What I’m enjoying the most is just really seeing the teamwork and the connections," Muir says. "I am enjoying my time, and it is a challenge, but I like a challenge. I’ve really been looking forward to it."

The festival is still looking for volunteers. Anyone interested can visit holidayalley.ca/get-involved to apply.

If you know a special volunteer, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

 

History comes to life in heritage village

Author: Bill Redekop
ARBORG -- Bjorn and Lara Sigvaldason had 16 children.
The family used flour sacks for curtains. Lara baked 24 loaves of bread at a time to feed her brood. Her best set of dishes were bone china from Berkshire, England.

Gliding into Winter Fun!

Author: Gail J McDonald
The Interlake! What a wonderful & fascinating place we either choose to live in or were born here.
Stay tuned each month for an article about tourism happenings in the Interlake- fun filled events, new "gems" to explore and what's exciting on the scene for this beautiful region! 

Under the Boardwalk

Author: Carolin Vesely
Author takes readers back to Winnipeg Beach's heady heyday. The first "resort" in Manitoba the author tells "WHY" it made such a difference in the lives of the young and courting folks of the day. 

Willow is Nature's ReBar!

Author: Kevin Rollason
At times, it seems Lake Winnipeg is determined to become Lake Agassiz again. The ice-age lake that formed 13,000 years ago included present-day Lake Winnipeg, Lake Manitoba, Lake Winnipegosis and Lake of the Woods. It spread all the way west to the ...

Driving Discovery: The Interlake in Manitoba

Author: Shel Zolkewich
Manitoba boasts two gigantic lakes (and about 99,998 smaller ones). Nestled between lakes Winnipeg and Manitoba is a region called the Interlake. It’s a place where farming and commercial fishing keep the economy chugging along. Where crops and shoreline meet, you’ll see wide open spaces, big skies, bigger smiles and great food. Let’s go for a drive!

Icelandic pride on display in Gimli

Author: Elizabeth Fraser
Gimli was filled on the weekend with Viking aficionados homesteading a temporary village and re-enacting battles at this year's 124th annual Icelandic Festival of Manitoba's living history exhibit. But Vikings weren't the only ones roaming the streets.

OP-ED: THE GROWING NEED TO FOCUS ON TOURISM

The role tourism plays into our provincial economy may surprise you. Based on 2011 tourism data from Statistics Canada the amount spent by visitors in Manitoba totaled more than $1.4 billion. That makes up about 3.6 per cent of our total Gross Domestic Product (GDP). While we can document the data of how much is spent, what is hard to document is the impact tourists play for specialized operators in smaller, seasonal communities

5 ways to help heal Lake Winnipeg

Author: CBC News 
The Manitoba government recently launched a billion-dollar effort to help communities reduce phosphorous emissions that end up in Lake Winnipeg. But it's a plan that could take years to establish. Lake Winnipeg most threatened in world in 2013. Lake Winnipeg fisherman worried about return of algae

Lake Winnipeg, Manitoba -More of Canada's Places of a Lifetime

Author: By Robin Esrock
When Winnipeg locals talk about "going to the coast," they mean the sandy shores of Lake Winnipeg, about an hour away. Part of the draw, says Joanne Liang, a senior buyer at the landmark H.P. Tergeson general store, is that "it's really affordable. The lake and beaches are beautiful," she says. "Because we have so many beaches, they can accommodate a lot of people without feeling too crowded."

7 cottagey words you’ll only hear in Canada

shutterstock_108271466Author: By Sara Chappel

Photo by Rachel Duchesne/Shutterstock.com
If you’re a certain age, you’ll remember Molson Canadian’s famous Joe Canada rant (which went viral before going viral was a thing), in which the actor unleashes a torrent of patriotic vocabulary: “A tuque is a hat, a chesterfield is a couch, and it is pronounced zed…”

Page 1 of 2

Latest Events

Wed Dec 13, 2017 @10:00AM - 03:00PM
Happy Habitats
Wed Dec 13, 2017 @11:00AM - 04:00PM
Johanna Vrienten & Greg McKenzie Exhibit
Wed Dec 13, 2017 @ 6:30PM - 07:30PM
Highland Dance Classes
Thu Dec 14, 2017 @11:00AM - 04:00PM
Johanna Vrienten & Greg McKenzie Exhibit
Thu Dec 14, 2017 @ 7:00PM - 10:00PM
Astronomy Night - Winter Constellations
Fri Dec 15, 2017 @11:00AM - 04:00PM
Johanna Vrienten & Greg McKenzie Exhibit

Please publish modules in offcanvas position.